Real life stories as seen and told by medical staff working at the frontline with critical injury in children.

The Australian Government Department of Health, with The George Institute for Global Health hosted the 1st of two National Injury Prevention Strategy round tables on the 18th of March in Sydney.

The day was well attended by a large range of cross-sectional industry, government, health and consumer representatives. Nine CHIPA members were in attendance (see photo and the end of this email).

The George Institute is leading the development of the strategy, in particular Dr Kate Hunt, who is a Senior Research Fellow in their Injury Division. I am incredibly encouraged and reassured that Dr Hunt is leading this work as she and her team are knowledgeable in the area, inclusive, intelligent and very, very capable.

The roundtable started with a presentation of the injury burden in Australia by Clara Jellie of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This was followed by Dr Hunter presenting a summary of the evidence for various injury preventions. These reviews are being conducted to ensure our new plan is evidence based (as much as possible) and does not duplicate existing strategies. An incredible amount of work has been completed thus far, including a synthesis of all systematic reviews relating to injury prevention interventions, and a summary of core elements, principles and overarching focus from 50 strategies that relate in some way to injury prevention, for example, the National Mental Health Strategy, the National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan.

Discussion and data were collected from attendees to rank guiding principles and priorities of the new plan. This was followed by action planning, specifically, identifying the major enablers and barriers to progressing injury prevention – appropriate resourcing and implementation was the biggest. It was encouraging to note the resounding opinion of those in the room, including federal government representatives in the room was that this strategy had to be designed to be enacted, and data monitoring  simplified.

There is another roundtable in Melbourne next week.

I will aim to keep you informed as developments occur.

Thanks for your ongoing support.

Kate

Children have a statistically significantly higher risk of dying from their injuries if their usual residence is regional/remote Australia.

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Transport-related injuries rank as the second most costly mechanism of injury for children.